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You always have the right to stop working with a lawyer: it’s your legal right. How you can fire them, what happens to fees, and how to hire a new lawyer will be gone over in this article. But first, are you sure you should fire your lawyer?

13. What do the lawyer’s clients say about her? Go to her website. Are there testimonials from former clients? Is she willing to let you contact other clients for a reference? The best way to understand how you will be treated is to talk to other clients.

Be wary of promises – Some avocat spĂ©cialisĂ© contre les notaires s these days, though not many of them, will make promises for a particular outcome. That is impossible for any lawyer to predict.

Ask about the process and timing – based on your circumstances, what does the lawyer advise be done and what is the process? How long will it take. It is important to have a realistic understanding of how long the process will take. Unfortunately, legal proceedings sometimes take months, or longer, to resolve depending on the issues.

There are many different exceptions to the time limits in New York. For example, if you were treated in a City Hospital such as Coney Island Hospital or Jacobi Hospital and you feel a doctor or nurse treated you improperly that resulted in injury, you’d have only 90 days to file a claim against them. Then you’d have only one year and 90 days from the date of the malpractice within which to start a lawsuit. BUT WAIT! You can’t start your lawsuit until after you’ve filed a claim against the agency that ‘owns’ the hospital. See…it gets complicated. That’s why it’s so important to learn about the time limits you have. YOU MUST BECOME FULL INFORMED.

Does the lawyer charge hourly, a flat rate, or a contingency fee? How much is it? The fees can vary substantially depending on a lawyer’s experience, location of practice, and areas of practice. Usually a lawyer’s hourly cost can range from $150 – $350 per hour. Flat fees are are widely dependent on the nature of a case. Simple divorces, minor criminal cases, and bankruptcies can range from $400 and up. Contingency cases are common in personal injury cases and are often 33% of the recovered amount, but they can range from 25% – 40%.

Ask about legal fees – does the attorney charge by the hour or provide services for a flat fee? Will you need to provide an upfront retainer or deposit. If so, how much? What happens to that retainer or deposit at the end of the case? Will it be returned to you? How often will you be billed? What types of expenses will you be charged for? Does the lawyer accept credit cards or offer a payment plan? What happens if you get behind on your bill?

A good lawyer is hard to find and, in most cases, a hard lawyer is good to find. Ensure you get the best by taking the time to find the right person, one who ticks all the boxes and has the right qualifications, as well as the right personality.